A college diploma is worth much more than the parchment on which it’s written. It represents all the hard work, the hours of studying and researching, the time spent in lectures and labs and your ability to navigate through all those classes and requirements to reach a successful end. While this slim slip of paper represents much, it can often get misplaced or forgotten as you move on to a lucrative career in your chosen field, move, marry and get on with the details of life.

It can take weeks to receive a copy of your diploma after you have made copies of all the information you need to submit and have found the correct person to whom you should submit your request. As soon as you notice that your diploma is missing, begin the process so that you will have it on hand if the need arises.

For What Is a Diploma Used?

You may need a high school diploma replacement to give to an employer to verify that you indeed graduated from the school. Some major corporations collect a lot of background information on potential employees and need physical verification in paper form.

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Colleges may ask for a copy of your high school diploma with your admission packet. If you are applying to be a teacher or to enter a master’s program, you may need to show a copy of any diplomas you have earned in your entire school career.

How to Display a Diploma

Considering all that a college diploma represents, it deserves a space on the wall in a good frame. Some people may not want to boast of their accomplishment but don’t want to simply stick the diploma in a drawer.

There are a few ways to respectfully display a diploma:

  • Custom document framing – Frame a diploma with a hand-chosen frame and UV-resistant glass.

  • Plaque framing – Showcase your diploma on a wooden board with an acrylic finish.

  • Laminating – Preserve the paper diploma under a slick of laminate that will be easy to hang or store.

  • Picture box – Collect meaningful mementos to include with the display of your diploma.

A craft store can ensure your diploma is nicely framed in an appropriate way so the diploma won’t be damaged by exposure to the sun or humid conditions.

High School Diploma Replacement

Each school district will have different requirements for obtaining a copy of your high school diploma. A diploma is considered an official document, so they don’t just hand them out to whoever may be asking. Be prepared to show your identification, a signature and personal information to verify that you are who you say you are.

To get a copy of a high school diploma, contact the high school administration office. If the administration office isn’t helpful, the school district can help you track down a copy. They may require a fee to print a new diploma and ask for mailing costs.

A high school diploma replacement can take weeks to receive, particularly if you don’t live in the city where you graduated. If it’s been some time and your former high school has closed or the district has changed, the Department of Education can assist you. This may take quite a bit longer.

Getting a Copy of Your College Diploma

A copy of a college degree certificate can be used for a variety of situations. From employment to graduate school applications, having a copy of your college diploma can be beneficial.

Contact the registrar for the requirements you need to complete in order to get a copy of your diploma. Prepare to turn in copies of your state or school identification and address verification documents such as utility bills, mortgage statements or rental leases.

To get a copy of a college diploma, you may need to submit a written request. This should include your birth date, Social Security number, graduation date, the name of the degree you earned and your current mailing address. You may need to have the request notarized.

Things Needed

  • Telephones
  • Picture Frames
  • Internet Access
  • Computers

About the Author

Kimberley McGee is an award-winning journalist with 20+ years of experience writing about education, jobs, business trends and more for The New York Times, Las Vegas Review-Journal, Today’s Parent and other publications. She graduated with a B.A. in Journalism from UNLV. Her full bio and clips can be seen at www.vegaswriter.com.