Parents in the state of Georgia have the right to homeschool their own children. While state law does list some specific homeschooling requirements, Georgia homeschool law is not as strict as many states. School superintendents may request that documents be turned in to show compliance to the law, but local school superintendents are not allowed to require parents to turn in documents that prove compliance. Any parent who wants to homeschool their children in Georgia may do so at any time of the year.

Submit a letter of intent to homeschool to the local school district. This must be done within 30 days of beginning to homeschool in Georgia. A letter of intent should be sent to the school district by September 1st every year following the first homeschooling year.

Develop a basic educational program that includes the subjects required in the state of Georgia. These subjects include math, science, social studies, language, and reading. Other subjects can be taught as desired, but these subjects are required.

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Submit a record of attendance to the school superintendent each month. The attendance record will not be used for any purpose other than providing a record of the days the homeschooled child attended school during the month submitted.

Teach homeschool classes for at least 4 1/2 hours each day, 5 days a week. This is the minimal required time that students be homeschooled each day in Georgia. Parents can hold classes any time of day, as long as the required time period is fulfilled.

Produce a progress report for each homeschooled child at least once a year. Keep the annual progress report on file for 3 years. Parents are not required to send in the report to the local school district.

Give students a standardized test every 3 years, starting when a child reaches 3rd grade. Test results do not have to be submitted to local school districts. Simply keep the test results on file.

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  • Parents must hold at least a high school diploma or GED. Alternatively, the parent may hire a tutor to teach the child who holds a high school diploma or GED.
  • Parents may only teach their own children at home.

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