A college interview is one of the best ways to get a deeper understanding of the culture and opportunities available on campus. You may be nervous at the prospect of an interview, but remember that it’s a two-way street. It’s important to make a good impression, but the college is also trying to impress you. Treat the interview as an opportunity to get to know someone new. If you’re relaxed, confident and prepared, you’ll have nothing to fear.

Prepare for Your College Interview

You can begin asking admission interview questions in advance of your campus visit. As you communicate with your admission counselor to schedule the interview, don’t be afraid to throw in a few preliminary questions:

  • Will I get to meet students and faculty?
  • What can I expect from my visit on campus?
  • Is there anything that I should bring with me to the interview?

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Do Research in Advance

You’ll learn about the good questions to ask at a university interview by doing some research about the college ahead of time. Take a virtual tour, surf around the college website and read any print material that you have. Consider the topics that are of most importance to you and begin formulating your questions.

Make a Good Impression

Dress to impress! If you look your best, you’ll show that you’re serious about the college interview. Even if the college isn’t your first choice, be as positive as you can be about the opportunity to learn more. Important college interview tips include: a positive attitude, a list of questions and a put together appearance.

Ask About Academic Opportunities

First and foremost, college is about academics. Begin your series of questions by asking about academic related issues. Your curiosity about learning will impress the interviewer. Good questions to ask at a university interview include:

  • What is the student/professor ratio?
  • Will TA’s be teaching any of my classes?
  • What kind of study abroad opportunities do you offer?
  • Will I have the opportunity to work with a professor on projects or research?

Inquire About Getting Involved on Campus

In addition to academic interests, admission interview questions can help you delve into learning opportunities that are available outside of the classroom. Consider the extra-curricular activities that you’re currently involved in and those that you would like to pursue once in college. Your questions will demonstrate your talents and potential, and this will be a plus in a college interview.

  • How many activities do most students get involved in on campus?
  • What is your biggest or most popular student organization?
  • Is it possible to start a new campus club if I don’t see one that interests me?
  • Do you have service-learning trips during holiday breaks?

Learn About the Social Atmosphere

It only makes sense that the social scene on campus is an important variable in the college decision-making process. Throw a couple of questions about campus fun onto your list, but don’t hesitate to ask a student tour guide about what it’s really like.

  • What kinds of activities are planned for students at nights and on the weekends?
  • What is the best way to make new friends on campus?
  • Do you have sororities and fraternities?
  • How can I meet new people before classes begin?

Touch Base After You Leave Campus

Once you’ve left campus, it’s important to follow up with a thank you email. Be sure to send an email to each student, faculty or admission representative that you met. You can also use these emails to ask follow-up questions that you may think of once you’ve had time to process the experience.

  • When will applicant decision letters be mailed?
  • Is it possible to schedule an overnight visit as I narrow down my college choices?
  • How can I connect with a faculty member or student from my major of interest?

About the Author

Dr. Kelly Meier earned her doctorate from Minnesota State Mankato in Educational Leadership. She is the author and co-author of 12 books and serves as a consultant in K-12 and higher education. Dr. Meier is is a regular contributor for The Equity Network and has worked in education for more than 30 years.